Discriminating Taste PDF Download

Are you looking for read ebook online? Search for your book and save it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Download Discriminating Taste PDF full book. Access full book title Discriminating Taste by S. Margot Finn. Download full books in PDF and EPUB format.
Cooking

Discriminating Taste

Discriminating Taste PDF Author: S. Margot Finn
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813576881
Category : Cooking
Languages : en
Pages : 289

Book Description
For the past four decades, increasing numbers of Americans have started paying greater attention to the food they eat, buying organic vegetables, drinking fine wines, and seeking out exotic cuisines. Yet they are often equally passionate about the items they refuse to eat: processed foods, generic brands, high-carb meals. While they may care deeply about issues like nutrition and sustainable agriculture, these discriminating diners also seek to differentiate themselves from the unrefined eater, the common person who lives on junk food. Discriminating Taste argues that the rise of gourmet, ethnic, diet, and organic foods must be understood in tandem with the ever-widening income inequality gap. Offering an illuminating historical perspective on our current food trends, S. Margot Finn draws numerous parallels with the Gilded Age of the late nineteenth century, an era infamous for its class divisions, when gourmet dinners, international cuisines, slimming diets, and pure foods first became fads. Examining a diverse set of cultural touchstones ranging from Ratatouille to The Biggest Loser, Finn identifies the key ways that “good food” has become conflated with high status. She also considers how these taste hierarchies serve as a distraction, leading middle-class professionals to focus on small acts of glamorous and virtuous consumption while ignoring their class’s larger economic stagnation. A provocative look at the ideology of contemporary food culture, Discriminating Taste teaches us to question the maxim that you are what you eat.

Discriminating Taste

Discriminating Taste PDF Author: S. Margot Finn
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813576881
Category : Cooking
Languages : en
Pages : 289

Book Description
For the past four decades, increasing numbers of Americans have started paying greater attention to the food they eat, buying organic vegetables, drinking fine wines, and seeking out exotic cuisines. Yet they are often equally passionate about the items they refuse to eat: processed foods, generic brands, high-carb meals. While they may care deeply about issues like nutrition and sustainable agriculture, these discriminating diners also seek to differentiate themselves from the unrefined eater, the common person who lives on junk food. Discriminating Taste argues that the rise of gourmet, ethnic, diet, and organic foods must be understood in tandem with the ever-widening income inequality gap. Offering an illuminating historical perspective on our current food trends, S. Margot Finn draws numerous parallels with the Gilded Age of the late nineteenth century, an era infamous for its class divisions, when gourmet dinners, international cuisines, slimming diets, and pure foods first became fads. Examining a diverse set of cultural touchstones ranging from Ratatouille to The Biggest Loser, Finn identifies the key ways that “good food” has become conflated with high status. She also considers how these taste hierarchies serve as a distraction, leading middle-class professionals to focus on small acts of glamorous and virtuous consumption while ignoring their class’s larger economic stagnation. A provocative look at the ideology of contemporary food culture, Discriminating Taste teaches us to question the maxim that you are what you eat.

Women of Discriminating Taste

Women of Discriminating Taste PDF Author: Margaret L. Freeman
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820358142
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 269

Book Description
Women of Discriminating Taste examines the role of historically white sororities in the shaping of white womanhood in the twentieth century. As national women’s organizations, sororities have long held power on college campuses and in American life. Yet the groups also have always been conservative in nature and inherently discriminatory, selecting new members on the basis of social class, religion, race, or physical attractiveness. In the early twentieth century, sororities filled a niche on campuses as they purported to prepare college women for “ladyhood.” Sorority training led members to comport themselves as hyperfeminine, heterosocially inclined, traditionally minded women following a model largely premised on the mythical image of the southern lady. Although many sororities were founded at non-southern schools and also maintained membership strongholds in many non-southern states, the groups adhered to a decidedly southern aesthetic—a modernized version of Lost Cause ideology—in their social training to deploy a conservative agenda. Margaret L. Freeman researched sorority archives, sorority-related materials in student organizations, as well as dean of women’s, student affairs, and president’s office records collections for historical data that show how white southerners repeatedly called upon the image of the southern lady to support southern racial hierarchies. Her research also demonstrates how this image could be easily exported for similar uses in other areas of the United States that shared white southerners’ concerns over changing social demographics and racial discord. By revealing national sororities as significant players in the grassroots conservative movement of the twentieth century, Freeman illuminates the history of contemporary sororities’ difficult campus relationships and their continuing legacy of discriminatory behavior and conservative rhetoric.

Neurobiology For Dummies

Neurobiology For Dummies PDF Author: Frank Amthor
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118689313
Category : Medical
Languages : en
Pages : 416

Book Description
The approachable, comprehensive guide to neurobiology Neurobiology rolls the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the nervous system into one complex area of study. Neurobiology For Dummies breaks down the specifics of the topic in a fun, easy-to-understand manner. The book is perfect for students in a variety of scientific fields ranging from neuroscience and biology to pharmacology, health science, and more. With a complete overview of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the nervous system, this complete resource makes short work of the ins and outs of neurobiology so you can understand the details quickly. Dive into this fascinating guide to an even more fascinating subject, which takes a step-by-step approach that naturally builds an understanding of how the nervous system ties into the very essence of human beings, and what that means for those working and studying in the field of neuroscience. The book includes a complete introduction to the subject of neurobiology. Gives you an overview of the human nervous system, along with a discussion of how it's similar to that of other animals Discusses various neurological disorders, such as strokes, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia Leads you through a point-by-point approach to describe the science of perception, including how we think, learn, and remember Neurobiology For Dummies is your key to mastering this complex topic, and will propel you to a greater understanding that can form the basis of your academic and career success.

Aesthetic Realism

Aesthetic Realism PDF Author: Inês Morais
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3030201279
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 146

Book Description
This compelling book defends realism concerning the aesthetic—in particular, concerning the aesthetic properties of works of art (including works of literature). Morais lucidly argues that art criticism, when referring to aesthetic properties, is referring not ultimately to the critic’s subjective reactions, but to genuine properties of the works. With a focus on contemporary discussion conducted in the analytic tradition, as well as on arguments by Hume and Kant, this book characterizes the debate in aesthetics and the philosophy of art concerning aesthetic realism, examining attacks on the objectivity of values, the ‘autonomy thesis’, and Hume’s sentimentalism. Considering and defusing scepticism concerning the significance of the ontological debate about aesthetic realism, Morais discusses two powerful attacks on aesthetic realism before defending the doctrine against them and providing a positive realist account of aesthetic properties.

Discriminating Taste

Discriminating Taste PDF Author: S. Margot Finn
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813576873
Category : Cooking
Languages : en
Pages : 288

Book Description
For the past four decades, increasing numbers of Americans have started paying greater attention to the food they eat, buying organic vegetables, drinking fine wines, and seeking out exotic cuisines. Yet they are often equally passionate about the items they refuse to eat: processed foods, generic brands, high-carb meals. While they may care deeply about issues like nutrition and sustainable agriculture, these discriminating diners also seek to differentiate themselves from the unrefined eater, the common person who lives on junk food. Discriminating Taste argues that the rise of gourmet, ethnic, diet, and organic foods must be understood in tandem with the ever-widening income inequality gap. Offering an illuminating historical perspective on our current food trends, S. Margot Finn draws numerous parallels with the Gilded Age of the late nineteenth century, an era infamous for its class divisions, when gourmet dinners, international cuisines, slimming diets, and pure foods first became fads. Examining a diverse set of cultural touchstones ranging from Ratatouille to The Biggest Loser, Finn identifies the key ways that “good food” has become conflated with high status. She also considers how these taste hierarchies serve as a distraction, leading middle-class professionals to focus on small acts of glamorous and virtuous consumption while ignoring their class’s larger economic stagnation. A provocative look at the ideology of contemporary food culture, Discriminating Taste teaches us to question the maxim that you are what you eat.

Parody and Taste in Postwar American Television Culture

Parody and Taste in Postwar American Television Culture PDF Author: Ethan Thompson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136839798
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 168

Book Description
In this original study, Thompson explores the complicated relationships between Americans and television during the 1950s, as seen and effected through popular humor. Parody and Taste in Postwar American Television Culture documents how Americans grew accustomed to understanding politics, current events, and popular culture through comedy that is simultaneously critical, commercial, and funny. Along with the rapid growth of television in the 1950s, an explosion of satire and parody took place across a wide field of American culture—in magazines, comic books, film, comedy albums, and on television itself. Taken together, these case studies don’t just analyze and theorize the production and consumption of parody and television, but force us to revisit and revise our notions of postwar "consensus" culture as well.

Play to Progress

Play to Progress PDF Author: Allie Ticktin
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0593191935
Category : Family & Relationships
Languages : en
Pages : 272

Book Description
A game-changing book on child development--and the importance of physical play--for this digital and screen age. For children to develop to their fullest potential, their sensory system—which, in addition to the big five of sight, hearing, taste, touch, and smell, includes movement and balance (vestibular), body awareness (proprioception), and internal perception (interoception)—needs to be stimulated from the time they are born. Their senses flourish when they explore their environment by touching new textures, including their food, running, jumping, climbing, and splashing outside. As an occupational therapist with a specialty in sensory integration, Allie Ticktin has seen an increase in cases of children who struggle to sit in circle time or at their desk upright and who are delayed in walking, talking, and playing by themselves and with their peers. In the recent past, kids spent their days playing outside and naturally engaging their sensory system and building key developmental skills. But with increasing time pressures for both kids and parents, children are spending more time in front of screens and less time exploring and interacting with their environment. The good news is that boosting your child’s sensory development doesn’t take enormous amounts of time or supplies, or any special skills. Here, Ticktin discusses the eight sensory systems and how a child uses them, and offers easy, fun activities—as well as advice on setting up a play area—that will encourage their development so that your little one will be better able to respond to their emotions, build friendships, communicate their needs, and thrive in school. That’s the power of sensory play.

The Architect and Monetarian

The Architect and Monetarian PDF Author: Edwin Martin Stone
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 64

Book Description


Research

Research PDF Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages :

Book Description


Sounds and the City

Sounds and the City PDF Author: Brett Lashua
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319940813
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 443

Book Description
This book draws from a rich history of scholarship about the relations between music and cities, and the global flows between music and urban experience. The contributions in this collection comment on the global city as a nexus of moving people, changing places, and shifting social relations, asking what popular music can tell us about cities, and vice versa. Since the publication of the first Sounds and the City volume, various movements, changes and shifts have amplified debates about globalization. From the waves of people migrating to Europe from the Syrian civil war and other conflict zones, to the 2016 “Brexit” vote to leave the European Union and American presidential election of Donald Trump. These, and other events, appear to have exposed an anti-globalist retreat toward isolationism and a backlash against multiculturalism that has been termed “post-globalization.” Amidst this, what of popular music? Does music offer renewed spaces and avenues for public protest, for collective action and resistance? What can the diverse​​ histories, hybridities, and legacies of popular music tell us about the ever-changing relations of people and cities?